Last edited by Fegal
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

2 edition of Spring-season deer browsing of Douglas-fir on the Capitol Forest in western Washington found in the catalog.

Spring-season deer browsing of Douglas-fir on the Capitol Forest in western Washington

Glenn LeRoy Crouch

Spring-season deer browsing of Douglas-fir on the Capitol Forest in western Washington

by Glenn LeRoy Crouch

  • 218 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Forest Service in [Portland, Or.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Deer -- Food -- Washington (State) -- Capitol State Forest.,
  • Douglas fir -- Effect of browsing on -- Washington (State) -- Capitol State Forest.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Glenn L. Crouch.
    SeriesU.S. Forest Service research note PNW -- 84.
    ContributionsPacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination8 p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18224683M

    Section II. Seeing the Forest for the Trees: Placing Washington's Forests in Historical Context Washington's forests have always been a prominent element of its history. Until the past years, tall and dense stands of Douglas fir, hemlock, spruce, and cedar. Stand Development in Natural Douglas Fir Forests Identifying Mature and Old Forests in Western Washington 29 Figure Clearcutting was the dominant silvicultural technique used through most of western Washington’s timber harvest history and is the origin of many of today’s stands.

    Case Study 2: Pacific Northwest Hemlock – Douglas-Fir Forests & Northern Rockies Ponderosa Pine – Douglas-Fir Forests Trend: • LANDFIRE FRCC is higher for maritime Douglas-fir - western hemlock systems in the Oregon Coast Range and western Cascades than for ponderosa pine – Douglas-fir systems in the Northern Rockies. Fire History of a Douglas-Fir-Oregon White Oak Woodland, Waldron Island, Washington Article (PDF Available) in Northwest Science 85(2) July with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

    Ecology. These two subspecies thrive on the edge of the forest, as the dark forest lacks the underbrush and grasslands the deer prefer as food, and completely open areas lack the hiding spots and cover they prefer for harsh weather. One of the plants that black-tailed deer browse is western poison oak, despite its irritant content. This deer often is most active at dawn and dusk, and is Family: Cervidae.   The deer use those areas at night, thus the abundant sign. I prefer the north side of the hill which typically contains better daytime cover. One of the best spots I have is a drainage that runs east- west, this means I have a open south side full of hardwoods and a thick north side.


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Spring-season deer browsing of Douglas-fir on the Capitol Forest in western Washington by Glenn LeRoy Crouch Download PDF EPUB FB2

Crouch, Spring-Season Deer Browsing of Douglas-Fir on the Capitol Forest in Western Washington, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service Research Notes, PNW (August, ), by: 1. Silvicultural options for young-growth Douglas-fir forests: the Capitol Forest study--establishment and first results / (Portland, Or.: U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, []), by Dean S. DeBell, David D. Marshall, and Robert O. Curtis (page images at HathiTrust). Spring-season deer browsing of Douglas-fir on the capitol forest in western washington.

US Forest Service Research Note. Stock and pasture management for establishment of radiata pine in farmland.

Ten-year height growth of Douglas-fir damaged by Hare and deer. APPRAISING DOWNED WOODY FUELS IN MONTANA FORESTS: Grand Fir-Larch-Douglas-Fir, Western Hemlock, We~tern Hemlock-Western Redcedar, and Western Redcedar Cover Types Will iam C.

Fischer INTERMOUNTAIN FOREST AND RANGE EXPERIMENT STATION MENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREST SERVICE OGDEN, UTAH Author: William C. Fischer. Douglas fir encroaching into the old hay fields have been clipped to low bush level excepting a few that are somehow able to getting a leader past browsing height.

The trees then pass into a poodle cut phase with a bushy bottom and top and a cropped area in between at browsing : Dan Mcshane. The effects of defoliation on Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) growth in 3-year-old plantations were studied at two sites near Alsea Cited by: 9.

Continued: The Structure of Natural Young, Mature, and Old-Growth Douglas-Fir Forests in Oregon and Washington by Thomas A. Spies and Jerry F. Franklin Plant Species Diversity and Occurrence in Young, Mature, and Old-Growth Douglas-Fir Stands in Western Oregon and Washington. This ride took place at Capitol state forest in Washington state.

This ride was a fun event and I was surprised at the turn out due to a last minute change in. logging company that operated in the Capitol State Forest located near Olympia, Washington, during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. To date, 15 known and assumed logging camps used by MCLC have been identified, but there are large gaps in the forest where no MCLC camps are known to have existed.

Calculating the averageFile Size: 8MB. Here are some pictures from way up near the headwaters of Grizzly Creek. The forest is right on the redwood transition areas where redwood and coastal Douglas-fir and oak woodlands collide.

The combination of good soils, heavy rain, and persistent fog make these areas very productive for trees. grandis [Dougl. ex D. Don] Lindl.) forest series (ponderosa pine dominated) of northeast Oregon that historically experienced low- severity fire regimes, Olson () found riparian fire return intervals to be similar to those of upslope forest sites in two watersheds.

However, for dry Douglas-fir forests in eastern Washington, Everett et al. Another fun day of shooting at Capitol Forest. Comment below if you live near here or have ever been here. Spring-season deer browsing of Douglas-fir on the Capitol Forest in western Washington / by Glenn L.

Crouch. [Portland, Or.]: Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Forest Service, [] SDU51 no The structure of 5 natural Douglas-fir stands, located on relatively good sites within the Tsuga heterophylla zone in western Washington and western Oregon, was analysed in Stand ages ranged from 50 to years.

Vertical dia­ grams and crown projection maps were used to identify developmental phases. During the past century, forest structure on south-facing slopes of Mount Constitution, Orcas Island, Washington, has changed from open-grown Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) mixed with prairie to primarily closed canopy forest.

Density of open-grown Douglas-fir was approximately 7 stems/ha in the 19th century, while current density of trees in closed-canopy mature forest is stems/ha. Amounts and structural characteristics of coarse woody debris (CWD) were examined in relation to stand age and site moisture condition in Pseudotsuga menziesii stands in western Oregon and Washington.

Stands ranged from 40 to yr old, and most if not all, originated after by: Coarse Woody Debris in Douglas-Fir Forests of Western Oregon and Washington Article (PDF Available) in Ecology 69(6) December with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

that contains the concentrations of old and large Douglas-fir. Few old and large Western Redcedar were found in the survey. Additional work to identify ecosystems with old and large Douglas-fir and Western Redcedar in the Squamish Forest District will be an essential component of a progam to maintain biodiversity in the area.

Hunting in Capitol Forest Washington. Washington State Fish and Wildlife for more information. In "Native Trees of Western Washington," Washington State University's Kevin Zobrist examines regional indigenous trees from a forestry specialist's unique perspective.

He explains basic tree physiology and a key part of their ecology--forest stand dynamics/5(12). Douglas-fir – western hemlock forest at the Wind River Canopy Crane Research Facility located in the Thornton T.

Munger Re-search Natural Area, Gifford Pinchot National Forest in southwest-ern Washington State, U.S.A. (45°49′N, °57′W, altitude m). The stand basal area is dominated by Douglas-fir and western hem-lock.If Trees Could Talk: Middle School Curriculum “The Greatest Good” Teaching Guide; Lynn W.

Day Distinguished Lectureship in Forest and Conservation History. The fire history of Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir forests is varied and complex because Douglas-fir exists in a variety of forest types over a wide range of environments.

Douglas-fir has been dominant over this region because of disturbance by fire and the species' adaptations to fire. Human-caused fires have been locally important, but lightning appears to be most significant.